Entrar

Questões de Concurso: CODEMIG

Confira aqui questões de CODEMIG para Concurso grátis com gabarito ou respostas comentadas. Acesse milhares de questões resolvidas e organizadas para treinar online. Se preferir, baixe o PDF!

Filtrar questões
💡 Selecione apenas 2 campos por vez e clique em filtrar.


Paulo, André e Pedro são irmãos. Um deles é médico, outro advogado, e o outro é dentista. Sabe- se que:

1. Ou Paulo é médico, ou Pedro é médico, 2. Ou Paulo é advogado, ou André é dentista, 3. Ou Pedro é dentista, ou André é dentista, 4. Ou André é advogado, ou Pedro é advogado.

Portanto, as profissões de Paulo, André e Pedro são, respectivamente:

🧠 Mapa Mental
O Decreto n. 6.022/2007 e a Resolução n. 1.299/2010 dispõem sobre o Sistema Público de Escrituração Digital (Sped). Considere os preceitos dessas normas e analise as seguintes assertivas sobre o escopo e o funcionamento desse sistema e sobre as obrigações que ele cria para as empresas e seus respectivos profissionais responsáveis pela escrituração contábil e fiscal.

Em seguida, assinale com V diante das assertivas verdadeiras e com F diante das assertivas falsas.

( ) O Sped é um sistema administrado pela Secretaria da Receita Federal que tem como objetivo unificar as atividades de recepção, validação, armazenamento e autenticação de livros e documentos que integram a escrituração contábil e fiscal das empresas, mediante fluxo único computadorizado de informações.
( ) Os livros e documentos que integram a escrituração contábil e fiscal devem ser emitidos em forma digital e também mantidos sob a guarda e responsabilidade da empresa, mesmo tendo sido enviados eletronicamente para os usuários do Sped, na forma e prazos previstos na legislação aplicável.
( ) Cada um dos usuários do Sped, de acordo com suas competências de regulação, normatização, controle e fiscalização das empresas, estabelecem formalmente a obrigatoriedade, periodicidade e prazos para a apresentação dos livros e documentos que integram a escrituração contábil e fiscal.
( ) A escrituração contábil e fiscal só é válida se embasada em documentos de origem interna ou externa e deve conter informações que permitam identificar univocamente todos os registros que integram um mesmo lançamento contábil, além de histórico que represente a essência econômica de cada transação.

Assinale a alternativa que apresenta a sequência CORRETA.
🧠 Mapa Mental
A moratória de um tributo estadual pode ser concedida:
🧠 Mapa Mental
Hércules pratica exatamente um esporte a cada dia da semana. Às segundas-feiras ele joga vôlei e dois dias depois ele joga basquete. Hércules corre três vezes por semana, mas nunca dois dias consecutivos. Ele também pratica natação e joga tênis, mas nunca pratica natação no dia seguinte ao jogo de tênis ou à corrida.

O dia da semana em que Hércules joga tênis é:
🧠 Mapa Mental
Texto associado.
TEXT 2
Innovation is the new key to survival


[…]

At its most basic, innovation presents an optimal strategy for controlling costs. Companies that have invested in such technologies as remote mining, autonomous equipment and driverless trucks and trains have reduced expenses by orders of magnitude, while simultaneously driving up productivity.

Yet, gazing towards the horizon, it is rapidly becoming clear that innovation can do much more than reduce capital intensity. Approached strategically, it also has the power to reduce people and energy intensity, while increasing mining intensity.

Capturing the learnings 

The key is to think of innovation as much more than research and development (R&D) around particular processes or technologies. Companies can, in fact, innovate in multiple ways, such as leveraging supplier knowledge around specific operational challenges, redefining their participation in the energy value chain or finding new ways to engage and partner with major stakeholders and constituencies.

To reap these rewards, however, mining companies must overcome their traditionally conservative tendencies. In many cases, miners struggle to adopt technologies proven to work at other mining companies, let alone those from other industries. As a result, innovation becomes less of a technology problem and more of an adoption problem.

By breaking this mindset, mining companies can free themselves to adapt practical applications that already exist in other industries and apply them to fit their current needs. For instance, the tunnel boring machines used by civil engineers to excavate the Chunnel can vastly reduce miners" reliance on explosives. Until recently, those machines were too large to apply in a mining setting. Some innovators, however, are now incorporating the underlying technology to build smaller machines—effectively adapting mature solutions from other industries to realize more rapid results. 

Re-imagining the future

At the same time, innovation mandates companies to think in entirely new ways. Traditionally, for instance, miners have focused on extracting higher grades and achieving faster throughput by optimizing the pit, schedule, product mix and logistics. A truly innovative mindset, however, will see them adopt an entirely new design paradigm that leverages new information, mining and energy technologies to maximize value. […]

Approached in this way, innovation can drive more than cost reduction. It can help mining companies mitigate and manage risks, strengthen business models and foster more effective community and government relations. It can help mining services companies enhance their value to the industry by developing new products and services. Longer-term, it can even position organizations to move the needle on such endemic issues as corporate social responsibility, environmental performance and sustainability.

(http://www2.deloitte.com/content/dam/Deloitte/ru/Document s/energy-resource /ru_er_tracking_the_trends_2015_eng.pdf)
“For instance" in “Traditionally, for instance, miners have focused on extracting" (l. 34-35) is used to:
🧠 Mapa Mental
Texto associado.
TEXT 3
Sustainable mining – oxymoron or a way of the future?


Mining is an activity that has persisted since the start of humans using tools. However, one might argue that digging a big hole in the ground and selling the finite resources that come out of that hole is not sustainable, especially when the digging involves the use of other finite resources (i.e. fuels) and produces a lot of greenhouse gases.

The counter argument could go along the lines that minerals are not being lost or destroyed through mining and mineral processing – the elements are being shifted around, and converted into new forms. Metals can even be extracted from waste, seawater or even sewage, and recycled. But a more simple argument is possible: a mine can be sustainable if it is economically, socially and environmentally beneficial in the short and long term. To be sustainable, the positive benefits of mining should outweigh any negative impacts. […]

Social positives are often associated with mines in regional areas, such as providing better amenities in a nearby town, or providing employment (an economic and social positive). Social negatives can also occur, such as dust, noise, traffic and visual amenity. These are commonly debated and, whilst sometimes controversial, can be managed with sufficient corporate commitment, stakeholder engagement, and enough time to work through the issues. Time is the key parameter - it may take several years for a respectful process of community input, but as long as it is possible for social negatives to be outweighed by social positives, then the project will be socially sustainable.

It is most likely that a mine development will have some environmental negatives, such as direct impacts on flora and fauna through clearing of vegetation and habitat within the mine footprint. Some mines will have impacts which extend beyond the mine site, such as disruption to groundwater, production of silt and disposal of waste. Certainly these impacts will need to be managed throughout the mine life, along with robust rehabilitation and closure planning. […]

The real turning point will come when mining companies go beyond environmental compliance to create "heritage projects" that can enhance the environmental or social benefits in a substantial way – by more than the environmental offsets needed just to make up for the negatives created by the mine. In order to foster these innovative mining heritage projects we need to promote "sustainability assessments" - not just "environmental assessments". This will lead to a more mature appreciation of the whole system whereby the economic and social factors, as well as environmental factors, are considered in a holistic manner.

(adapted from https://www.engineersaustralia.org.au/western-australia-division/sustainable-mining-oxymoron-or-way-future. Retrieved on August 10, 2015)
As regards the content of Text 3, analyse the assertions below:

I - It is well-known that the resources extracted from mines are endless.
II - The social negative impacts of mining may be minimized as time goes by.
III - Sustainable assessment has a wider field of action than environmental assessment.
IV - There is agreement that negative impacts of mining are restricted to the site.

The correct sentences are only:
🧠 Mapa Mental
Texto associado.
TEXT 3
Sustainable mining – oxymoron or a way of the future?


Mining is an activity that has persisted since the start of humans using tools. However, one might argue that digging a big hole in the ground and selling the finite resources that come out of that hole is not sustainable, especially when the digging involves the use of other finite resources (i.e. fuels) and produces a lot of greenhouse gases.

The counter argument could go along the lines that minerals are not being lost or destroyed through mining and mineral processing – the elements are being shifted around, and converted into new forms. Metals can even be extracted from waste, seawater or even sewage, and recycled. But a more simple argument is possible: a mine can be sustainable if it is economically, socially and environmentally beneficial in the short and long term. To be sustainable, the positive benefits of mining should outweigh any negative impacts. […]

Social positives are often associated with mines in regional areas, such as providing better amenities in a nearby town, or providing employment (an economic and social positive). Social negatives can also occur, such as dust, noise, traffic and visual amenity. These are commonly debated and, whilst sometimes controversial, can be managed with sufficient corporate commitment, stakeholder engagement, and enough time to work through the issues. Time is the key parameter - it may take several years for a respectful process of community input, but as long as it is possible for social negatives to be outweighed by social positives, then the project will be socially sustainable.

It is most likely that a mine development will have some environmental negatives, such as direct impacts on flora and fauna through clearing of vegetation and habitat within the mine footprint. Some mines will have impacts which extend beyond the mine site, such as disruption to groundwater, production of silt and disposal of waste. Certainly these impacts will need to be managed throughout the mine life, along with robust rehabilitation and closure planning. […]

The real turning point will come when mining companies go beyond environmental compliance to create "heritage projects" that can enhance the environmental or social benefits in a substantial way – by more than the environmental offsets needed just to make up for the negatives created by the mine. In order to foster these innovative mining heritage projects we need to promote "sustainability assessments" - not just "environmental assessments". This will lead to a more mature appreciation of the whole system whereby the economic and social factors, as well as environmental factors, are considered in a holistic manner.

(adapted from https://www.engineersaustralia.org.au/western-australia-division/sustainable-mining-oxymoron-or-way-future. Retrieved on August 10, 2015)
The title suggests that the expression “sustainable mining" may:
🧠 Mapa Mental
Texto associado.
TEXT 3
Sustainable mining – oxymoron or a way of the future?


Mining is an activity that has persisted since the start of humans using tools. However, one might argue that digging a big hole in the ground and selling the finite resources that come out of that hole is not sustainable, especially when the digging involves the use of other finite resources (i.e. fuels) and produces a lot of greenhouse gases.

The counter argument could go along the lines that minerals are not being lost or destroyed through mining and mineral processing – the elements are being shifted around, and converted into new forms. Metals can even be extracted from waste, seawater or even sewage, and recycled. But a more simple argument is possible: a mine can be sustainable if it is economically, socially and environmentally beneficial in the short and long term. To be sustainable, the positive benefits of mining should outweigh any negative impacts. […]

Social positives are often associated with mines in regional areas, such as providing better amenities in a nearby town, or providing employment (an economic and social positive). Social negatives can also occur, such as dust, noise, traffic and visual amenity. These are commonly debated and, whilst sometimes controversial, can be managed with sufficient corporate commitment, stakeholder engagement, and enough time to work through the issues. Time is the key parameter - it may take several years for a respectful process of community input, but as long as it is possible for social negatives to be outweighed by social positives, then the project will be socially sustainable.

It is most likely that a mine development will have some environmental negatives, such as direct impacts on flora and fauna through clearing of vegetation and habitat within the mine footprint. Some mines will have impacts which extend beyond the mine site, such as disruption to groundwater, production of silt and disposal of waste. Certainly these impacts will need to be managed throughout the mine life, along with robust rehabilitation and closure planning. […]

The real turning point will come when mining companies go beyond environmental compliance to create "heritage projects" that can enhance the environmental or social benefits in a substantial way – by more than the environmental offsets needed just to make up for the negatives created by the mine. In order to foster these innovative mining heritage projects we need to promote "sustainability assessments" - not just "environmental assessments". This will lead to a more mature appreciation of the whole system whereby the economic and social factors, as well as environmental factors, are considered in a holistic manner.

(adapted from https://www.engineersaustralia.org.au/western-australia-division/sustainable-mining-oxymoron-or-way-future. Retrieved on August 10, 2015)
When Text 3 informs that elements can be “shifted around" (l. 9), it means they can be:
🧠 Mapa Mental
Texto associado.
TEXT 3
Sustainable mining – oxymoron or a way of the future?


Mining is an activity that has persisted since the start of humans using tools. However, one might argue that digging a big hole in the ground and selling the finite resources that come out of that hole is not sustainable, especially when the digging involves the use of other finite resources (i.e. fuels) and produces a lot of greenhouse gases.

The counter argument could go along the lines that minerals are not being lost or destroyed through mining and mineral processing – the elements are being shifted around, and converted into new forms. Metals can even be extracted from waste, seawater or even sewage, and recycled. But a more simple argument is possible: a mine can be sustainable if it is economically, socially and environmentally beneficial in the short and long term. To be sustainable, the positive benefits of mining should outweigh any negative impacts. […]

Social positives are often associated with mines in regional areas, such as providing better amenities in a nearby town, or providing employment (an economic and social positive). Social negatives can also occur, such as dust, noise, traffic and visual amenity. These are commonly debated and, whilst sometimes controversial, can be managed with sufficient corporate commitment, stakeholder engagement, and enough time to work through the issues. Time is the key parameter - it may take several years for a respectful process of community input, but as long as it is possible for social negatives to be outweighed by social positives, then the project will be socially sustainable.

It is most likely that a mine development will have some environmental negatives, such as direct impacts on flora and fauna through clearing of vegetation and habitat within the mine footprint. Some mines will have impacts which extend beyond the mine site, such as disruption to groundwater, production of silt and disposal of waste. Certainly these impacts will need to be managed throughout the mine life, along with robust rehabilitation and closure planning. […]

The real turning point will come when mining companies go beyond environmental compliance to create "heritage projects" that can enhance the environmental or social benefits in a substantial way – by more than the environmental offsets needed just to make up for the negatives created by the mine. In order to foster these innovative mining heritage projects we need to promote "sustainability assessments" - not just "environmental assessments". This will lead to a more mature appreciation of the whole system whereby the economic and social factors, as well as environmental factors, are considered in a holistic manner.

(adapted from https://www.engineersaustralia.org.au/western-australia-division/sustainable-mining-oxymoron-or-way-future. Retrieved on August 10, 2015)
The excerpt “one might argue" (l. 2) expresses:
🧠 Mapa Mental